Festival

Desert Hearts Festival Review Spring 2018

Photo Credit: GetTiny

Photo Credit: GetTiny

Written By: Kainoa Owens

The Desert Hearts Festival 2018 was nothing short of amazing! Back home for their 10th year anniversary at the Los Coyotes Indian Reservation!

Over the years, the festival has become known as one of the most popular, if not the best, ‘boutique festival’ to date. The festival brought a plethora of artists and performers from around the globe, creating a unique positive and loving atmosphere for their audience or techno-crazed-enthusiasts. The other forms of artistic participation ranged from yoga, sound healing, and more, however my most favorite was Shane and the Healing Sanctuary.

Photo Credit: GetTiny

Photo Credit: GetTiny

While normally boasting 3000-3500 capacity festival-goers each year, Desert Hearts truly could not contain their excitement, or their rate-of-inclusivity this year, as it seemed more like 5000 techno-ready souls dancing in the moonlight.

Photo Credit: Haley Busch

Photo Credit: Haley Busch

 

Despite the increase in capacity, the energy and message that Desert Hearts brings every year, ‘House, Techno, & Love.., We Are All Desert Hearts’, created a blissful dreamy wonderland that encouraged individuals to add onto the experience and express themselves in their own unique way.

Photo Credit: Jess Bernstein

Photo Credit: Jess Bernstein

This was my first Desert Hearts Festival experience, and it certainly will not be my last! The amount of love and freedom of expression was truly something to experience, and make your-own. The vibes and love from experienced Desert Heart goers, and new Desert Heart attendees (like myself) were of paradise.

Of course, unanimously the most influential part about Desert Hearts is the connection between us like-minded beautiful souls as we collectively sway ourselves to the ‘one stage, one vibe, one love’ in order to dance, and come together as a family to enjoy the eclectic sounds that these amazing producers and DJs exhibited.

Photo Credit: Haley Busch

Photo Credit: Haley Busch

Hands down my favorite performance of the weekend was Porky, Lee Reynolds, and Damian Lazarus.., back to back to back!

This trio took the stage late Saturday night into Sunday morning absolutely stacking the dance floor, and demolishing ears and similarly melting faces left and right, including my own.

Matt Tolfrey Unites with Desert Hearts Label

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Written By: Kainoa Owens

Desert Hearts have been very busy spreading their influence and mantra “House, Techno, & Love” across North America and some spots around the globe. Now, in their 6th rotation around the sun, they have recruited UK powerhouse DJ and producer, Matt Tolfrey!

His newest EP Nothing Like Home on the Desert Hearts label is out NOW!

This EP presents two tracks, ‘Nothing Like Home’ and ‘Fallen’.

Using an eclectic style of futuristic sounds, buzzy bass lines, as well as percussion components, his cultivating sound provokes an ‘it’s about to go down’ dance-craze.

These tasty beats have received huge support from a plethora of established artists such as, Desert Hearts producer Mikey Lion, Josh Butler, Audiojack, and more.

Mikey Lion, in particular, has described the EP as “one of [his] all-time favorite releases” signed to the Desert Hearts label.

Tolfrey never settles using one style, continuously experimenting with techno, house, and deep style beats that make you want to lose yourself in the rhythm.

His success can be traced back to his celebrated 13+ year label ‘Leftroom’, where for the 10th year anniversary, released a decade worth of compiled Leftroom classics, as well as unreleased delicates from collaborating artists including ‘Guti, Kate Simko, Chez Damier, and more.

 

Matt Tolfrey has been proving himself to be one of the more unique DJs in the industry. Renowned by fellow tech-house phenom Seth Troxler, as "the last great British DJ," Tolfrey has continuously delivered delightful sounds and beats for the last 15+ years, proving himself to be a exuberant DJ/Producer.

Having now been welcomed into the Desert Hearts label and family, we can expect nothing less than truly transcendent techno-tunes that tantalize our soul.

Matt Tolfrey and his all-embracing style and sounds mirror the positive love, connection and creativity that permeates around all Desert Hearts festivals and collaborations.

Below you can listen to his latest EP as well as his 'Ten Years of Leftroom Mix', and be sure to experience him in person April 27th - 30th at the Desert Hearts Spring 2018 Festival!

Desert Hearts Spring 2018 Festival

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Written By: Kainoa Owens

Nestled away upon the majestic mountains of the Los Coyotes Indian Reservation outside of east San Diego County, the Desert Hearts Festival returns April 27th-30th to once again delight and tantalize techno-lovers. Now in their 6th gathering since 2012, Desert Hearts has established itself as one of the most popular and inclusive music festivals—boasting a 3000-capacity dreamland wherein festival-goers will have the opportunity to ‘celebrate all that make us human’ through the mediums of art and dance.

Additionally, the festival will host a wide variety of community-based artists and performers to create a ‘truly unique atmosphere embedded with artistic participation and imagination’. Further found at Desert Hearts are various forms of healing included but not limited to Yoga, Workshops, Sound Healing, Crystal Healing, Reiki, Energy Work, Spoken Word and Relax/Recharge zones.

Over the years, Desert Hearts has based themselves around all-encompassing festivals such as Burning Man and Lightning in a Bottle. Their mantra, “House, Techno, & Love…We Are All Desert Hearts” echoes a distinct sense of radical inclusiveness that is vital to their main purpose of ‘spreading as much love and positive vibes as possible’ at each of every one their events.

As a ‘boutique music festival’, they provide a similarly unique experience as these larger music festivals, but with the advantage of being smaller and more intimate in size. The ambiance they create each year for their ever-increasing family of techno-hungry-hippies is centered on the idea to have one stage, one heartbeat.

Photo By: Jacob Avanzato

Photo By: Jacob Avanzato

Desert Heart goers from around the world journey to the festival to immerse themselves in the atmosphere of ubiquitous love, creativity and family that this musical oasis provides. Desert Hearts fanatic, entrepreneur and Reiki healer, Lizeth, recalls her first Desert Hearts experience dancing through the crowd as ‘something magical’ or 'like entering a whole different world entirely’.

The feelings of unity and love permeate throughout all Desert Hearts shows in Southern California and now across North America, so if you’re unable to catch this year’s festival, be sure to check out one of their shows!

This festival is currently sold out; however, we highly recommended checking out these 5 artists on the Desert Hearts 2018 lineup:

Lee Reynolds

Marques Wyatt

Lubelski

Damian Lazarus

Matt Tolfrey

Get Amped up for Halloween with our Minimal Effort, All Hallows Eve Mix

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Written by Robin Nguyen

This Saturday, October 28th, Minimal Effort is once again delivering top-notch talent to the LA dance scene at its 4th annual Halloween installment, All Hallow's Eve, which this year features Claptone, MK (Marc Kinchen), Damian Lazarus, Dusky, All Day I Dream's label head, Lee Burridge, and many others to chill your bones and possess your soul (melodically speaking). We've created a playlist below to give you a taste of the artists' sounds.

This year the event will be held at ENOX events in downtown LA, at a sprawling industrial space that will span one indoor factory dance floor and an outdoor stage to host all your ghoulish delights.

Set times below, so whether you plan to join the Dead Garden or hit the Masquerade, look alive and make sure you have a haunted, hell of a time. Tickets and VIP table packages are available at www.minimaleffort.net 

Check out our special Spotify playlist below:

Desert Daze 2017 – Institute of MentalPhysics

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By Kainoa Owens

Positioned upon 420 acres in the high desert of Joshua Tree, California, the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Institute of Mentalphysics, has become home to the best rock festival this year, Desert Daze.

The institute, in all its glory and awe, rests upon a rare geological confluence of three underground aquifers, and a measurable magnetic field that is said to channel “natural energy” to help desert-goers find clarity. Also known as “a portal to your inner being,” the enlightenment-based philosophical institution was established for those seeking to understand the “physics” of their minds, or to gain a higher sense of consciousness. It’s an apt location for anyone looking to escape the confines of their everyday life, or attempt to join in and connect with one-another through other forms of mentalphysics like yoga and music itself.

Surrounded by captivating architecture, elegant fountains, labyrinths, and beautiful garden paths, Desert Daze has solidified itself as an extraordinary festival experience bringing a sort of kindred vibe similar to the likes of Lightning in a Bottle, and dare I say.., Symbiosis? Nevertheless, the message of Desert Daze is similar with other transformative festivals (as mentioned above), in that they seek to provide a spiritual awakening, reformation, transformation, and inspiration for the individual.

This festival, accompanied with the mysticism of its location and venue, is primed to continuously get bigger, badder, and weirder each year. Phil Pirrone and his altruistic family & crew have done a fantastic job curating the music lineup and festival-goer mentality. Throughout the three-day weekend, the mix of festival goers ranged from many young and old burners, to garage-metal, 90s alternative rock enthusiasts, and everything in between. Needless to say, the lineup this year was STACKED.

In its sixth-installment since its birth in 2012, Desert Daze showcased an inconceivable rock lineup of artists old and new, as well as a wide spectrum of diverse rock-genres. The music this year spanned from raw, electronic punk, garage rock, and punk rock, to crushing power rock, droning sludge metal, minimalist jazz-fusion, and beyond.

The performances this weekend were much to be longed for. More specifically, the sound of a type of psychedelic jazz, Lee Fields & the Expressions, and BadBadNotGood were sensational, while Courtney Barnett & Kurt Vile and the Sea Lice headlining Friday night soothed my soul. Saturday was by far the busiest day, with the biggest names, where attendance could have easily been around 5000 desert goers. Performances from a kind of electro-pop Mr. Elevator, which made way for Twin Peaks, JJUUJJUU, and John Cale as some of the daytime shredders. The stoner metal band Sleep, performing their 1992 album Holy Mountain, was something truly special, bringing back the past, reincarnating 80’s and 90’s hard metal rock.

Iggy Pop, the 70-year-old ageless wonder and “Godfather of Punk,” did not slow down, but instead threw down! As a neighboring desert goer looks at me and exclaims in disbelief, “The dude is 2000 years old, from the prehistoric era, and he STILL is absolutely owning it!” Shirt-off, shimmying out on to the stage, while hurling his mic-stand, and executing a famed stage dive, Iggy Pop and his group made everyone else seem above average, and more comparatively made Black Sabbath, one of my favorite bands feel outdated.

Aside from the environs of the institute, the most important takeaway from the weekend was the share of love for music, smiley-vibes in the crowd, the lyrical passion, the crushing rock gifted by the musicians, and of course the nostalgia in us that is mothaafuckkin’ rock & roll.

It is evident that Desert Daze has developed into a forward-thinking rock & roll music festival with a novel, free-spirited vibe, and an inclusiveness that without a doubt makes it the best rock festival this year, and potentially a new giant in festivals every year to come.

Trying to put so much on you takes so much on me

All Linkin' Park pictures were grabbed from the band's official  Twitter  page

All Linkin' Park pictures were grabbed from the band's official Twitter page

By Sol Pérez-Pelayo

Estaría mintiendo si dijera que yo era mega fan, o que tenía días pensando en esa banda o en él o profetizando su muerte. Aun así, tampoco voy a condenar a quienes lo hagan, o a los que de repente les entró un amor a la banda o al cantante a raíz de su muerte. No soy de las que critican a la gente porque “se hacen fans” de la noche a la mañana de algo que no conocían pero de pronto por algo como una muerte, se convierte en trending topic. Desgraciadamente los artistas valemos más muertos que vivos. Estoy hablando del reciente suicidio de Chester Bennington, el vocalista de LINKIN PARK.

 

El suicidio de una persona famosa siempre es noticia, no es la primera vez inclusive en este año, (basta recordar al gran Chris Cornell) que los newsfeeds de Facebook son invadidos por el suicidio o muerte de un cantante o músico que de algún modo marcó mi vida. La primera vez que sentí este dolor particular que me dolía por todos lados pero al mismo tiempo sin una localización real, fue con Kurt Cobain.

Así fueron suicidándose ídolos que yo aún sin conocer en persona, pude sentirme más cercana a ellos que con las personas con las que convivía a diario. Esto es, porque la conexión que compartimos es directa de ese sentimiento incomparable que te provoca una canción, cuando te toca, como algo antiguo, como si leyera algo dentro de ti que nada ni nadie mas puede.

Desde una edad muy temprana he disfrutado mucho de la música y sobre todo del rock y metal. Cuando yo estaba creciendo en el comienzo del milenio, muchas cosas se estaban innovando, y aunque yo gastaba hasta mi último “domingo” en CDs, los MP3 comenzaban a invadir la industria de la música. De cualquier modo, aunque yo era fan del metal vieja escuela como el Thrash, Black nórdico y Death americano o europeo, lo que me tocó disfrutar como parte de mi formación y no sólo musical tocando en mi banda, sino musical en formación como una chica con gustos no comunes en un mundo lleno de estereotipos, fue por supuesto y sin lugar a dudas, el llamado Nü Metal.

Este género se diferenciaba de todo lo que yo hasta entonces había escuchado porque combinaba diferentes estilos. Éstos tenían sin duda gran influencia del heavy metal, los riffs eran comunes y repetitivos mientras los solos virtuosos del antiguo heavy metal desaparecieron. Las voces eran una composición de vocales limpias, aunadas con elementos de hip hop, rap y hasta un poco de gutural. Todo esto en ese momento no lo había analizado con tanto detenimiento. Yo tenía 14 años en un mundo donde me buscaba encontrar camino, tocando el bajo, en el atletismo o escribiendo poemas. Pero fue en la música donde descubrí un refugio especial. Creo que muchos participamos de esta melomanía casi psicopática, de esa conmoción donde el mundo se detiene, se parte en mil pedazos y cada uno de ellos perfila una fracción de nuestro soundtrack personal que forja nuestra vida y nos profesa un contexto que ilumina ese momento, el cual es único y que nunca volverá a existir.

 

A los que nacimos en la última mitad de los 80s nos tocó ser adolescentes justo cuando el milenio estaba a punto de adherirse en nuestras vidas como un huracán. Es cierto que teníamos toda nuestra vida hablando de eso, que conjeturábamos que habría carros volando y robots con humor como en los Supersónicos, pero entre más se iba acercando la fecha, todo eso parecía una alucinación. Recuerdo también durante esta época haber descubierto a Friedrich Nietzsche, persona que se quedaría conmigo el resto de mi vida. Descubrí el nihilismo y qué como yo, habían existido ya escritores que sentían esta extraña rabia que quizás formaba parte de mí. De un comportamiento hormonal recién adquirido, de un tipo de enojo adolescente sin justificación específica, pero que conformó gran parte de mi personalidad. En un mundo donde Rick Rubin era el productor con las bandas alternativas más escuchadas del mundo, buscaba encontrarle sentido a mi vida por medio de la música cada día. Con estas letras me había identificado en el grunge, pero el Nü metal cayó justo en el momento perfecto.

Hicimos clic, las letras de enojo, de frustración y el entrar en un milenio cada vez menos humano, cada vez más dedicado a lo terrenal era parte de lo que conformaba mi dedicación a toda esta corriente en la cual crecí.

Aunque siempre me he inclinado más por lo pesado, lo brutal, lo ácido, encontré un día que dentro de mi amor incondicional al Black Metal nórdico, a Metallica,  a Sepultura y recientemente adquirido a Korn y a Slipknot había lugar para algo que nunca había existido hasta entonces en mis gustos musicales.Era mi hábito de cada semana, ir a las tiendas de discos y gastar hasta mi último centavo en discos que había descubierto en el programa de radio el Despeñadero o uno que existía hace mucho que se llamaba Metalmorfosis en radio Universidad de Guadalajara, cuando me topé con HYBRID THEORY. Se dice que no se debe de juzgar un libro por su portada, y estoy de acuerdo de eso,  porque la portada a mi gusto era espantosa, y como mencioné me gusta la música mas “pesada” en cambio, decidí darle a esta banda de la cual había leído en HIT PARADER pera que jamás había escuchado; LINKIN PARK una oportunidad.

 

 

A las pocas veces que lo escuché, el disco se convirtió  en uno de mis discos favoritos del momento. No tardé en buscar mas información y encontré una foto que es de los recuerdos más intensos que tengo de mi adolescencia. Era una foto promocionado el disco Hybrid Theory; eran los brazos tatuados con flamas de Chester Bennington, así sin cara, enmarcaban un micrófono y en seguida, encantaron mis pupilas En segundo de secundaria los brazos en flamas de Chester fueron la portada de mi cuaderno de English Literature. Tan sólo en los Estados Unidos vendieron 10 millones de copias de su álbum debut, seamos fans o no seamos fans, tendríamos que estar negados al no aceptar que fueron una influencia de cardinal escala, por lo menos en el género. Yo estaría siendo hipócrita al decir que no marcaron mi vida de algún modo, por lo menos con ese álbum. Es cierto como dije al comienzo, que ya no era seguidora la banda, que me había alejado mucho ya inclusive del NÜ Metal y me he quedado estacionada ya para siempre en el Death y el Black metal, géneros de los que siempre he escuchado con singular alegría y entusiasmo, por lo cuales Linkin Park y el Nü Metal no duraron en mi vida.

Hablando de la trascendencia, lo más valioso que nos deja un artista o un escritor es su legado. Una de mis obsesiones más pronunciadas tanto en mi vida como en mis escritos es la idea vivir eternamente mediante una obra que logre la trascendencia a través del tiempo. Es la única forma de vivir más allá de la vida etérea que tenemos, de que sigamos en el mundo aun después de haber dejado de respirar.

Con la noticia del supuesto suicidio de Chester Bennington, la cual de verdad encontré lamentable, resurgieron en mí las antiguas ideas del suicidio. El suicidio era un tema que me obsesionaba de adolescente, el tener el control de tu vida al punto de decidir cuando terminarla, no tanto como una última salida a una vida con la cual ya no puedes y decides dejar. Ambos puntos son vertientes por las cuales las personas quizás cesan con su vida, pero realmente me intrigaba la idea de ¿por qué tanta gente que yo admiraba se suicidaba?

Nietzsche habla de su teoría del Eterno Retorno; se repite lo mismo por siempre. Alguien que sufre mucho, ¿por qué querría repetir lo que con la muerte pudo acabar? La idea de repetir lo mismo involucra la idea de amor fati o el amor al destino. Hay voluntad de vivir, pero esto también implicaría que hay voluntad de morir. La voluntad de poder acuñada por Nietzsche crea al superhombre después de anunciar la muerte de Dios y entrar en nihilismo inevitable.  Resulta quizás un poco aterradora la idea del Eterno Retorno, pues sabemos que pasa al final siempre, sabemos que moriremos. Pero no sabemos la mayoría del tiempo cuanto nos queda de éste y ni la causa de nuestra muerte. Si nos ponemos contra el infinito, el tiempo, el espacio y el universo tendríamos la idea de que no somos nada en sí, nuestra existencia se va a reducir a si bien nos va 70 y pico de años y contra el tiempo eterno es una insignificancia. ¿Es que gracias a esto, pudiéramos decidir vivir intensamente? ¿Vivir pensando en que podría ser el último día?

Haciendo un paralelismo, quizás hasta medio injusto; Chester Bennington y Linkin Park tuvieron en su tiempo bastante éxito, pero era cierto que ya no gozaban de tal ni de total apoyo de sus fans como lo fue en un principio. Ahora que ha muerto, y que ha decidido voluntariamente dejar este plano, sus fans quizás arrepentidos muchos de haberlo abandonado en su camino como seguidores, han resurgido de las profundidades de sus ordenadores o quizás muchos sean nuevos. Como dije, yo no condeno esto, cada quien sabe que hace y lo que dice. La muerte de alguien más abre en los humanos un cierto sentimiento de culpa y de miedo, porque vemos en ella nuestra propia muerte, nuestra impotencia de poder hacer algo, porque ya es demasiado tarde. Ya es demasiado tarde para Chester, para toda la gente que le llamó poser  o vendido o que dejó de admirarlo a conveniencia. Ya es tarde también para todos ellos que aún lo quieren y que su muerte ha dejado un hueco en su vida, hayan sido sus cercanos o no. No obstante, sólo es tarde de algún modo para la vida, para poder hacer algo más con ella. El suicidio de Chester despertó en mí estos sentimientos nihilistas que descubrí a la par de su banda y de mi guía intelectual. La filosofía y la música siempre van a formar parte de mi vida y de la forma en que la veo y la analizo.

De cualquier manera, nuestra idiosincrasia mexicana de tratar con la muerte como algo chusco nos permite hacer bromas de las tragedias a la brevedad posible. Los memes o mofas de algo que un principio es algo aberrante no se hacen esperar. No estoy segura si es ya algo de nuestro geist mexicano o si de plano ya estamos insensibles ante el dolor ajeno, cosa que me aterroriza. Hay miles de opiniones: que si era un egoísta, que de que le servía tanta fama, familia etc. La verdad es que no podemos ni tenemos derecho a juzgar a nadie, pero se me olvida que en las redes todos hemos sido así, jueces déspotas de situaciones que en verdad no nos incumben, que hay expertos en todo aunque no hayan estudiado nada.

Hasta ayer tenía mucho tiempo que no escuchaba a la banda y quizás como muchos dicen sólo por el furor o el recuerdo los puse. Puedo decir honestamente que me transporté a mi adolescencia, de nuevo tenía 15 años, descubría muchas cosas en mi vida y regresaba esos años donde empecé a fortalecer las raíces que hasta ahora me han mantenido fiel a mí misma. Dice Nietzsche: “el individuo ha luchado siempre para no ser absorbido por la tribu. Si lo intentas, a menudo estarás solo, y a veces asustado. Pero ningún precio es demasiado alto por el privilegio de ser uno mismo”.

New Orleans' Buku Festival 2016

Coverage: Garrett Hazelwood

Photography: Lauren Rackley, BUKU/ALive

 

Off Tchoupitoulas, between the train tracks and the Mississippi River, Buku Music Festival kicked off its fifth year of auditory bliss this past weekend. In a city renown as a mecca for music, Buku has established itself as one of the highlights of New Orleans’ annual music calendar. But contrary to tradition, this festival eschews the jazz and blues for a lineup that winds it’s way from deep house to indie rock to hip-hop and future funk, without ever missing a beat.

This year’s headliners included GRiZ, Pretty Lights, CHVRCHES, Kid Cudi, Cashmere Cat, Above & Beyond, and Aluna George, along with dozens of other acts that kept all four stages occupied for two ten-hour days of non-stop performance. The venue sprawled out across an industrial district in the Lower Garden District, with stages in a vaulted ballroom, a massive warehouse filled with Mardi Gras floats, an alleyway just feet from the Mississippi, and an outdoor lot backdropped by the towering brick smokestacks of an abandoned power plant.

Though inner-city commuter festivals like this one tend not to have much in the way of community, Buku makes an effort to keep the “Bukulture” strong by building communal chillout areas, like the giant hammock they strung up between two storage containers and the seating area they installed alongside the river. Despite the sprawling festival grounds, there is an intimacy to the venue, particularly at the Back Alley stage, where DJs spun beneath a stack of wooden pallets as barges passed within a stone’s throw in the light cast by the Crescent City Connection Bridge.

There were also a few surprise shows in the central areas between stages, where local street performers rolled out a few speakers, plugged in, and had at it. One of these, a performance by “New Thousand,” was undoubtedly amongst the highlights of the weekend for those lucky enough to be passing when it happened. A mad violinist with a foot pedal, a keyboardist, a guy on a touchpad synth, and a hang drummer playing to a crowd of about fifty of us brought the energy to a peak that rivaled even the main stage performers. (These guys don’t have much web presence, but they’re well deserving of a wider audience. Check out their Facebook here.)

 

 

Of course, the headliners certainly didn’t disappoint. Though acoustics in the warehouse left something to be desired, GRiZ brought down the house mixing his heavy bass lines and fat drops with that signature sax. His Friday night performance also brought in an electric guitar, a female vocalist, and some fancy work with the trumpet. On the outdoor stage, Kid Cudi sang to the light of a thousand cell phones held aloft in the crowd, while as many voices in the audience sang along to “Day’n’Nite.” For those looking for a heavy helping of whomp, Baauer brought the trap and turned the bass up to eleven.

Those with milder dispositions enjoyed bobbing heads to BØRNS’ mellow indie rock. But there were few opportunities for down-tempo, and it wasn’t long after nightfall when Pretty Lights put on a live band performance that those in attendance will be talking about for quite some time. Many of the weekend’s best shows, though, were seen by smaller crowds, with the artists connecting up close and personal. Casey Veggies brought his A-game flow, CRWNS threw down with some heavy drops in his up-tempo trap as a light rain fell at sunset, and Tokimonsta slayed her set with characteristic steez, though relatively few were there to see it.

Supporting this stellar lineup of musicians, the Buku Krewe ran a sharp festival, with every performance going off exactly on time and the grounds staying clean and friendly throughout the weekend. And despite being set-up similarly to LA’s FYF Fest, the NOLA crowd kept the vibes unpretentious and down-to-earth.

A young festival with young event staff and a mostly college-age crowd, Buku is just getting started and already one of the premier festivals in the South. As they continue to grow and attract bigger names and attendance numbers, this is certainly a festival to keep an eye on. If they can manage to weather the growing pains without losing that spark of community that seems about to bloom, Buku has a bright future.